artPontiac :: Make/live/see art
 

Stone School Gallery
Stone School Gallery
28, rue Mill St.
Portage-du-Fort (Québec)
819-647-2291
galerie@artpontiac.com

Gallery hours:
11-4pm, Saturday and Sunday
Friday night vernissages: 6-8pm

» 2014 exhibitions
» 2014 Call to artists

» About the Gallery
» Stone School rental
» 2013 exhibitions
» 2012 exhibitions

For artists
» Exhibition guidelines

May 9 – June 1, 2014 : : Vernissage: May 9, 6-8 PM
Valérie Mercier, Les Bâtisseurs Monolithe

When Art is Let Loose in the Fields
A traveling art exhibition on the theme of agriculture.

Vernissage: May 10, 6-8 pm
Website: www.croquezlart.com/en/

Group show: Emily Rose Michaud, Heiwa Michaud, Isabelle Godbout, Mélanie Meyers, Valérie Mercier, Clément Hoeck, Dominique Plastre, Donald Doiron, Kate Douglas, Mélodie Coutou and Dominic Faucher.


When art is let loose in the fields is an artistic exhibition in three movements on the theme of agriculture and agri-food sector. The idea behind this project is to create new bridges between urban and rural life that surrounds and nourishes the city. The aim of this exhibition is to focus on the artistic talents of the region to implement different visions of agriculture and rural life in the Outaouais region.

Through an artistic interpretation, we want to raise awareness among the inhabitants of the region in the wealth of regional agriculture, its various functions, but also face its history, its evolution and future. The exhibition is divided into three movements and evoking alternately the past, present and future of our regional agri-food sector.

To view the videos go to:
www.croquezlart.com/en/first-movement/


Emily Rose Michaud


Dominic Faucher, Montage Poulet

June 24-July 14, 2013

By Tradition
Hyesuk Kim & Clement Hoeck

A fine craft exhibition of traditional Korean textile art and porcelain and stoneware pottery.

Vernissage: May 10, 6-8 pm
Website: clayrootsstudio.wordpress.com

Contact:
15 John Street, Campbell’s Bay, QC
Phone: (819) 648-2050
Hyesuk: hyesukkim@hotmail.com
Clement: clayrootsstudio@tlb.sympatico.ca\


Hyesuk Kim
traditional Korean textile art

Born in Ulsan South Korea, Hyesuk Kim completed a bachelor of textile arts at Ulsan University. The long tradition of POJAGI, Korean patch working goes back to a waste not want not ideal, necessary in times of hardship. It is part of Korea’s cultural heritage dating back to the Joseon dynasty and had many purposes such as table coverings, gift wrapping and served in wedding and Buddhist ceremonies. Her engagement with the material is evident in the many meticulously hand sewn pieces put together symmetrically or willingly irregular and necessitating an administrative patience.  Her work inspires a sense of calm and serenity.

Similar to North American quilting, the universality of this textile art speaks to everyone who sees it. Her tapestry work is done on a wooden frame as opposed to a loom and requires just as much patience to complete. Large pieces sometimes taking as much as a year to finish. She uses acrylic yarns or other textile to depict scenes inspired by nature.

Hyesuk Kim has been taking part in the Pontiac Artists Studio Tour since 2013. Both her Korean paper work (HANJI), Korean patchwork (POJAGI) and textile art has gained her a regional reputation. She showed recently in the Pulp and paper arts exhibition in Barry’s Bay Ontario, and will be showing in the city of Almonte’s Corridor gallery in 2015.


Clement Hoeck
porcelain and stoneware pottery

Born in Hull, Quebec, Clement was first enchanted and entranced by the potter’s wheel while studying arts at Gatineau’s Cegep de l’Outaouais in 1996-1998. To hone his craft abilities he obtained a vocational degree in ceramics from Montreal’s Centre de céramique Bonsecours in 2000. There with the practice of repetition an enabling of his intentions could take form. His admiration for the north Asian masters has had an influence in his choice of high fire stoneware and porcelain as well as his choice of Korean and Japanese glazes. Tradition in craft comes from the knowledge of a language of material and its expressive possibilities.  He sees handmade pottery as an antidote to mass production and our disconnection with what we consume, a cure to the impermanence around us. 

Clement has participated in many exhibitions since he started his studio practice in 2009. Among them he has taken part in the Pontiac Artists Studio Tour since 2009. In 2013 he had his first solo exhibition with the city of Gatineau‘s Espace Pierre-Debain as well as the Dust Evans Gallery in Ottawa’s Shenkman Arts Center.  He shows his work in many regional venues such as local studio tours and exhibitions in Quebec such as 1001 POTS.

Shown here are some of Clément’s functional stoneware pieces meant for everyday use as well as some decorative vases. The pots are decorated with various surface treatments such as chattering, hakeme slip brushwork and stamped impressions. The glaze covers are high Iron saturates as well as tin whites and ash based glazes.